Monday, January 16, 2012

Teacher Feedback from H.E.A.T. Walkthroughs Revisited

During the 2011-12 school year, the vision for the H.E.A.T./H.E.A.R.T. Walkthrough process continues to be 90/90; meaning, 90 percent of the teachers will document receiving face-to-face feedback from every classroom walkthrough and 90 percent of the teachers will indicate that the feedback was meaningful to them in terms of improving professional practice. According to Hall and Hord (2000), “Classroom walkthroughs that include focused one-on-one feedback is the most powerful staff development approach available to impact and change behavior.”

Given the multitude of activities (or distractions) occurring during a typical school day, how can one meet the tenets of the 90/90 plan while still addressing a myriad of other and often times, non-instructional priorities? Provided below are suggestions that can help increase face-to-face contact following a H.E.A.T./H.E.A.R.T. walkthrough.

1. Block out a time period on your office calendar each week to provide one-on-one feedback resulting from the H.E.A.T./H.E.A.R.T. walkthroughs.

2. Arrange a neutral venue away from your office, but on campus to meet with individual teachers so as to decrease possible interruptions.

3. Plan to meet with the teacher briefly in his/her classroom during or after class.

4. Send a note to the teacher to meet with you by a certain day so as to give flexibility to the teacher to decide when and where for their follow-up feedback.

5. Send an invite message inside a card for the teacher to meet with you at a specific time.

6. Arrange a brief chat over coffee before or after school.

7. Have your office assistant schedule the follow-up meetings with teachers receiving a H.E.A.T./H.E.A.R.T. Walkthrough.

These follow-up sessions are critical and pivotal to the success of your instructional program and can provide a solid foundation for improving school climate, instruction, and most importantly, student academic progress throughout the year.

Hall, G., & Hord, S. (2000). Implementing change: patterns, principles, and potholes. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.